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NBC Sports 18 May 2020

Wolves Training Session (RAW FOOTAGE - MAY 2020)

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Check out Wolves training footage from Sir Jack Hayward Training Ground as the Premier League prepares for a potential return.


WHO Emergencies Press Conference on coronavirus disease outbreak - 04 May 2020

Originally broadcast live on 04 May 2020, the daily press briefing on coronavirus COVID-19, direct from WHO Headquarters, Geneva Switzerland with Dr Tedros WHO Director-General, Dr Micheal Ryan, Executive Director of the Health Emergencies Programme, and Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical lead COVID-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme.
Originally broadcast live on 06 May 2020, the daily press briefing on coronavirus COVID-19, direct from WHO Headquarters, Geneva Switzerland with Dr Tedros WHO Director-General, Dr Micheal Ryan, Executive Director of the Health Emergencies Programme, and Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical lead COVID-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme.

The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) Tedros Ghebreyesus said the risk of returning to lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic "remains very real if countries do not manage the transition extremely carefully, and in a phased approach."


The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) Tedros Ghebreyesus said the risk of returning to lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic "remains very real if countries do not manage the transition extremely carefully, and in a phased approach."

Speaking at a press conference in Geneva today (06 May), Tedros said the COVID-19 pandemic would eventually recede, "but there can be no going back to business as usual. We cannot continue to rush to fund panic but let preparedness go by the wayside. As we work on responding to this pandemic, we must also work harder to prepare for the next one."

The WHO chief said, "Now is an opportunity to lay the foundations for resilient health systems around the world, which has been ignored for long. That includes systems to prepare, prevent and respond to emerging pathogens. If we learn anything from COVID-19, it must be that investing in health now will save lives later."

Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead at WHO's Health Emergencies Programme said the Organization assumed from the beginning that there would be human to human transmission, which was reflected in its first reporting to its Member States on 5 January.

Tedros said WHO's guidance before, during 14 January and after actually included the likelihood of human to human transmission that helped countries to prepare. He stressed that an assessment would be made in what is called the "after-action review," but called upon the world "to focus on fighting the fire."

Addressing reports that the first COVID-19 case in France may have occurred in December, Van Kerkhove said the authors of the paper "themselves say that it could be a false positive, but assuming it's not, it is possible that this individual may have had COVID-19 in December," a month before the first case in country was reported. She said more information about this particular case was needed, "if this is the case, to find out, the different types of history that this individual may have had."

Michael Ryan, Executive Director of WHO's Health Emergencies Programme, said in many cases when someone is seriously ill and a diagnosis can't be made, "very often, hospitals will freeze samples as a standard practice, which allows them to come back later and do further diagnostic tests should diagnosis or a new virus or anything else emerge," which is what happened in the French case. He added, "We look forward to any further examinations that are done by other researchers around the world who may find similar cases."
Originally broadcast live on 08 May 2020, the daily press briefing on coronavirus COVID-19, direct from WHO Headquarters, Geneva Switzerland with Dr Tedros WHO Director-General, Dr Micheal Ryan, Executive Director of the Health Emergencies Programme, and Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical lead COVID-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme.
Originally broadcast live on 11th of May 2020, the daily press briefing on coronavirus COVID-19, direct from WHO Headquarters, Geneva Switzerland with Dr Tedros WHO Director-General, Dr Micheal Ryan, Executive Director of the Health Emergencies Programme, and Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical lead COVID-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme.


WHO Director-General Tedros Ghebreyesus said, "Over the weekend we saw signs of the challenges that may lie ahead," with new cases reported in Wuhan and South Korea, and Germany reporting an increase in cases since easing restrictions.

Speaking at a press conference in Geneva today (11 May), Tedros said bars and clubs in South Korea were shut "as a confirmed case led to many contacts being traced. In Wuhan, China, the first cluster of cases since their lockdown was lifted was identified. Germany has also reported an increase in cases since an easing of restrictions." Tedros added, "Fortunately, all three countries have systems in place to detect and respond to a resurgence in cases."

Michael Ryan, Executive Director of WHO's Health Emergencies Programme, said countries like Germany and South Korea should not be criticized, "for looking, for finding, for being alert, for being ready and reacting quickly and engaging quickly to investigate, to isolate, to trace and to track; because that's what we've been saying. The virus is still here."

SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ryan, Executive Director, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
"I think now we're seeing some hope as many countries exits these so-called lockdowns, and this is good. It allows economic life to return, but extreme vigilance is required and not just vigilance, Many countries, as the DG has said, have made very systematic investments in building up their public health capacities during the lockdowns. Others have not. And we need every country now to put in place the necessary public health measures or the public health surveillance in order to be able to at least have a chance of avoiding larger second waves later."

Ryan said there was an assumption as COVID-19 spread around the world that "we're really just seeing the severe cases and the difficult cases of when the seroepidemiology comes that will demonstrate that, most of the people have been affected, and this will all be over, and we'll go back to normal business." He noted however, that the preliminary results from the seroepidemiologic studies show the opposite, with the higher proportion clinically ill people "because the number of people infected in the total population is probably much lower than we expected."

The Executive Director said there is "very little evidence to suggest that there are people who are persistently suffering from COVID-19," although data from hospitals shows that recovery time in a hospital is very long.


WHO's Technical Lead for COVID-19 Maria Van Kerkhove said there was "an alarming number" of healthcare worker infections, representing up to 10 percent of cases in some countries. She said WHO was continuing to better understand "where healthcare workers are getting infected, why healthcare workers are getting infected, and how can we ensure that this is reduced, and this stops."

Regarding children returnin to school, WHO chief Tedros Ghebreyesus said decision makers should reflect on a number of key factors when deciding on whether and how to reopen the schools. He said, "First, a clear understanding about current COVID transmission and severity of the virus in children is needed. Second, the epidemiology of COVID-19 where the school is geographically located, needs to be considered. Third, the ability to maintain COVID-19 prevention and control measures within the school setting."

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