RT America

RT America 2 Dec 2019

US' Hong Kong law 'piece of waste paper' – China

Description:

China has officially suspended all US Navy visits to Hong Kong in response to President Trump's signing of the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act. RT America's Faran Fronczak reports on the latest.

#QuestionMore #RTAmerica #InQuestionRT


Beijing's National People's Congress has overwhelmingly approved a plan that allows China to begin imposing new laws on Hong Kong. The controversial security law will bypass the territory's legislature. Protests have been escalating ahead of the changes. Critics say the law will remove pro-democracy advocates' right to free speech and to rally against control by China. And demonstrators say the law violates the freedoms promised under Hong Kong's special 'one country, two systems' status.
In Hong Kong, thousands took to the streets to protest Beijing's plans to impose a security law on the former British colony. It would bypass the local legislature and is expected to ban what China calls treason and sedition. Pro-democracy campaigners say it's a threat to Hong Kong's freedoms and semi-autonomy. Hong Kong's security chief says "terrorism" is on the rise in the city as police arrested some 180 protesters during renewed unrest.
And markets in Hong Kong fell after this weekend's protests over the proposed national security bill
China's ruling Communist Party has set in motion a controversial national security law for Hong Kong, a move seen as a major blow to the city's freedoms.

The law to ban "treason, secession, sedition and subversion" could bypass Hong Kong's lawmakers.

Critics say Beijing is breaking its promise to allow Hong Kong freedoms not seen elsewhere in China.

Pro-democracy activists have called for mass protests against what they see erosion of Hong Kong's autonomy.

Anger was already apparent on Friday, as a group of protesters descended on China's Liaison Office in Hong Kong.

#BBCOS #BBCOutsideSource
China's ruling Communist Party has set in motion a controversial national security law for Hong Kong, a move seen as a major blow to the city's freedoms.

The law to ban "treason, secession, sedition and subversion" could bypass Hong Kong's lawmakers.

Critics say Beijing is breaking its promise to allow Hong Kong freedoms not seen elsewhere in China.

Pro-democracy activists have called for mass protests against what they see erosion of Hong Kong's autonomy.

Anger was already apparent on Friday, as a group of protesters descended on China's Liaison Office in Hong Kong.

The draft law was submitted at the annual National People's Congress (NPC), which largely rubber-stamps decisions already taken by the Communist leadership, but is still the most important political event of the year.

Hong Kong, a semi-autonomous region and an economic powerhouse, was required to introduce security legislation after the handover from British control to Chinese rule in 1997.

After last year's wave of sustained and violent protest, Beijing is now attempting to push them through, arguing "law-based and forceful measures" must be taken to "prevent, stop and punish" such protests in the future.

Share Video:

Embed Video: