BBC News
BBC News 30 Sep 2020

Under-fire Trump seeks to qualify far-right remarks

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President Donald Trump has said a far-right group should "stand down" and let law enforcement do its work, after his refusal to explicitly condemn the group in a TV debate sparked a backlash.

Mr Trump said "I don't know who the Proud Boys are", a day after urging them in the election debate with Joe Biden to "stand back and stand by".

Proud Boys members called his debate comments "historic" and an endorsement.

Mr Biden said Mr Trump had "refused to disavow white supremacists".

The exchange came during the first of three televised debates between the two men ahead of the 3 November election. The debate descended into squabbling, bickering and insults, with US media describing it as chaotic, ugly and awful.

The commission that regulates the debates said it would introduce new measures for the next two to "maintain order". Mr Trump said they should get a new anchor and a smarter Democratic candidate.



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#France should receive its first deliveries of Moderna's coronavirus #vaccine this week, the head of the medical regulator said on Monday, as the government comes under fire for being too #slow with its vaccine rollout. France, which has a strong anti-vaccination movement, started its inoculation campaign at the end of December, as did many other European countries. But it has only vaccinated hundreds since then, versus tens of thousands in Germany and more a million in Britain.
So of course, Congress is pushing back.
Three far-right activists have been sentenced in a French court after an Al Jazeera investigation helped convict them of assault and in one case, inciting terrorism.
An undercover reporter from the network's Investigative Unit infiltrated a right-wing group in the northern French city of Lille, filming two members attacking a 13-year-old Muslim girl and a third making a toast to the Nazi party.
The three defendants received suspended sentences, showing that the court recognised the racist motives behind the men's actions and their far-right ideology, but many French Muslims may feel that the sentences fall short of justice.
Al Jazeera's David Harrison reports from Lille, France.
President Donald Trump is continuing his pressure-campaign against Vice President Mike Pence, telling thousands of supporters falsely that all Pence has to do to stay in office is send Electoral College votes back to the states to be recertified. (Jan. 6)

President Donald Trump sought to tighten the screws on his most loyal soldier, trying to pressure Vice President Mike Pence to use powers he does not have to overturn the will of voters in a desperate and futile bid to undo President-elect Joe Biden's victory in the November election.

Speaking to a crowd of thousands of supporters who rallied Wednesday on the Ellipse, just south of the White House, Trump declared, "If Mike Pence does the right thing we win the election."

Beginning at 1 p.m., Pence's role is to open the certificates of the electoral votes from each state and present them to the appointed "tellers" from the House and Senate in alphabetical order. At the end of the count, Pence, seated on the House of Representatives' rostrum, has the task of announcing who has won the majority of votes for both president and vice president.

Despite his largely ceremonial assignment, Pence is under intense pressure from the president and legions of supporters who want the vice president to use the moment to overturn the will of the voters in a handful of battleground states.

"All Vice President Pence has to do is send it back to the states to recertify and we become president and you are the happiest people," Trump said, repeating a falsehood he has been promoting leading up to the congressional session.

Pence told Trump during their weekly lunch in the West Wing on Tuesday that he did not believe he had the power to unilaterally overturn electoral votes, according to a person briefed on the one-on-one conversation. This person was not authorized to publicly discuss the private discussion, which was first reported by The New York Times, and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Trump said he spoke with Pence on Wednesday morning to urge him to act once again. "I said Mike, that doesn't take courage," he said. "What takes courage is to do nothing."

Pence has no such unilateral power under the Constitution and congressional rules that govern the count. It is up to the House and Senate to voice objections, and states' electors were chosen in accordance with state law, not fraudulently.

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