ABC News
ABC News 13 Jan 2021

Nancy Pelosi delivers remarks during House debate to impeach President Donald Trump

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The House Speaker was the first to deliver remarks to impeach Trump a second time, calling him "a clear and present danger."


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi opened debate for the second impeachment of President Trump for inciting the Capitol riot, saying the president posed a "clear and present danger" to the country. She called those who stormed the Capitol "domestic terrorists" and urged the Congress to act.
The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to impeach President Trump on one count of incitement of insurrection, making him the first president in U.S. history to be impeached twice. The vote came exactly one week after a mob of the president's supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol building in an effort to block Congress from counting the Electoral College votes and confirming President-elect Joe Biden's victory.

The vote was 232 in favor, 197 opposed. Ten Republicans joined 222 Democrats in voting to impeach.

The article of impeachment, introduced Monday by House Democrats, accuses Mr. Trump of "willfully inciting violence against the government of the United States" in violation of his constitutional oath and duty.

#HouseVote #PresidentTrump #Impeachment

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The House of Representatives voted on Jan. 13 to impeach President Trump a second time after the deadly U.S. Capitol breach. Ten Republicans joined Democrats in voting to impeach the president.
House lawmakers on Wednesday impeached President Trump for his role in last week's deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol, capping an extraordinary week of violence, apprehension and partisan brawling in Congress just as Washington cranks up security in preparation for Joe Biden's inauguration, just a week away.

The 232-197 vote was historic: It made Trump the first president in the country's history to be impeached twice.

And unlike the first debate, this time the president's Democratic critics had support across the aisle. At least nine Republicans joined every voting Democrat to approve the single impeachment article, which accuses Trump of inciting violence against the same federal government he leads

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), who oversaw both impeachment efforts, said Trump's refusal to concede his election defeat — and his subsequent efforts to rally supporters to the Capitol to overturn the election results — amounted to sedition. The president, she said, gave Congress no choice.

"We know we experienced the insurrection that violated the sanctity of the people's Capitol," Pelosi said in a floor speech before the vote. "And we know that the president of the United States incited this insurrection, this armed rebellion, against our common country.

"He must go," she added. "He is a clear and present danger to the nation that we all love."

The most prominent Republican to break with Trump was GOP Conference Chair Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), the No. 3 Republican leader and highest-ranking GOP woman in Congress, who said Trump "summoned the mob," "lit the flame" of the attack and — despite pleas from his Hill allies — refused to call it off.

"There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution," Cheney said in a statement.


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