NewsNet
NewsNet 18 Nov 2020

Hospitals Around the US Experience Patient Overflow During Coronavirus

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Some hospitals across the United States are starting to overflow with patients as a spike in COVID-19 cases continues. NewsNet's Danielle Radin reports.


This election year in the US has been unlike any other. With lockdowns and restrictions, journalists have been forced to adapt and find savvy ways to keep bringing you the news.

In this episode of Between Us, field producer Anar Virji shares her experience reporting from the heart of the US capital.
Andrea and Salsabila, nicknamed Dea and Salsa, are childhood friends from Indonesia. Both have been blind since birth.

At five years old, Dea moved with her family to the United States, while Salsa remained in Jakarta.

Now in the US, Dea attends a school for visually impaired students. In Indonesia, Salsa lives in a dormitory far from her parents so she can attend one of the few "inclusive schools" that accept visually impaired students.

With graduation from high school around the corner, Dea and Salsa support each other as they prepare for adulthood in two very different worlds.
"I can tell you that in the past three years and [several] months now that we have President Trump as the person leading DHS and all these agencies, we haven't been able to hold him accountable."

Erika Andiola, immigration rights activist, reacts to the immigration policies under the current US administration. More than 500 parents of the children separated at the southern US border are missing, according to the latest reports.

Watch #WeNeedToTalk with Malika Bilal on today's treatment of immigrants in the US, Obama's infamous deportation history and the Latino vote during the 2020 election.
Ahead of Election Day on November 3, we're answering your questions about the US presidential election and in particular the Electoral College. It's one of the most confusing aspects about the US election process. Many Americans themselves don't understand how it works, or even why it's still around. In five presidential elections so far - including the last one in 2016 - the eventual winner lost the popular vote, but won thanks to the Electoral College. We explain how it works.

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