CBS News
CBS News 11 Jan 2021

COVID "long haulers" turn to online support groups for help with lingering symptoms

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More and more patients are reporting long-lasting coronavirus symptoms and they're turning to online support groups in their recovery. Dr. Laurie Nadel, a psychotherapist and the author of "The Five Gifts," joins CBSN's Elaine Quijano with more on some of the mental health struggles COVID survivors are facing.

CBSN is CBS News' 24/7 digital streaming news service featuring live, anchored coverage available for free across all platforms. Launched in November 2014, the service is a premier destination for breaking news and original storytelling from the deep bench of CBS News correspondents and reporters. CBSN features the top stories of the day as well as deep dives into key issues facing the nation and the world. CBSN has also expanded to launch local news streaming services in major markets across the country. CBSN is currently available on CBSNews.com and the CBS News app across more than 20 platforms, as well as the CBS All Access subscription service.


Recent research found that about a third of patients who survived COVID developed alterations of brain function
WARNING: Video contains violent content.

An Associated Press photographer was assaulted by protesters outside the US Capitol on Wednesday. Video of the incident was shot by an AP colleague with their head cam. (Jan. 7)


It shows the photographer wearing protective gear being shoved by protesters until he topples over a wall.

Other protesters then helped him up and guided him through the crowd. The photographer was shaken, but uninjured.

A large crowd of Trump supporters rallied near the White House on Wednesday morning, and the president told them that he would go with them to the Capitol. He didn't. Instead he sent them off with incendiary rhetoric.

Capitol Police, who are charged with protecting Congress, turned to other law enforcement for help with the mob that overwhelmed the complex and sent lawmakers into hiding. Both law enforcement and Trump supporters deployed chemical irritants during the hourslong occupation of the complex before it was cleared Wednesday evening.

Four people died, including a woman who was shot and killed by police inside the Capitol. Three other people died after "medical emergencies" related to the breach, said Robert Contee, chief of the city's Metropolitan Police Department.

D.C. police said Thursday that 68 people were arrested, while Capitol police said 14 were arrested, most for unlawful entry. More than 50 Capitol and D.C. police were injured, including several who were hospitalized, officials said.
Signs of Wednesday's violent breach at the U.S. Capitol were still evident a day later as the nation's capital wondered how a such a large mob of pro Trump supporters was able to wreak havoc on Capitol Hill. (Jan. 7)

Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund on Thursday defended his department's response to the violent breach, issuing a statement that rioters attacked officers with metal pipes, chemical irritants and other weapons.

Lawmakers from both parties have pledged to investigate law enforcement's actions and questioned whether a lack of preparedness allowed a mob to occupy and vandalize the building.

Capitol Police, who are charged with protecting Congress, turned to other law enforcement for help with the mob that overwhelmed the complex and sent lawmakers into hiding.

The occupation of the Capitol lasted for hours before the complex was cleared Wednesday evening.

Four people died, one of them a woman who was shot and killed by police inside the Capitol.

Three people died after suffering "medical emergencies" related to the breach, according to the chief of the city's Metropolitan Police Department.

Police said 52 people were arrested as of Wednesday night, including 26 on the Capitol grounds.

More than a dozen police officers were injured, according to Metropolitan Police Chief Robert Contee.

The rioters were egged on by Trump, who has spent weeks falsely attacking the integrity of the election and had urged his supporters to come to Washington to protest Congress' formal approval of President-elect Joe Biden's victory. The protests interrupted those proceedings for nearly seven hours.

The mob broke windows, entered both the Senate and House chambers and went into the offices of lawmakers, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.
Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola says the Premier League should have a clear protocol for when there is a clash of heads or concussion.

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