Inside Edition
Inside Edition 4 Jan 2021

Christmas Tree Costume May Have Had Deadly Effect in ER

Description:

A staffer at a San Jose, California emergency room may have acted as a "one-person super spreader" after they tried to bring some cheer to their colleagues and patients by wearing an inflatable Christmas tree costume. Several dozen staffers have since tested positive for coronavirus, and investigators are looking into if the outbreak, which saw 43 people test positive for COVID-19, was linked to the inflatable costume. The fan that kept the costume inflated circulated unfiltered air.


New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio says tickets will be required to visit the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree this year to help prevent crowds amid the coronavirus pandemic. Watch his remarks.
At a press conference Monday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio outlined some of the COVID-19 safety measures in place to avoid crowds at this year's Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree. The lighting ceremony will be closed to the public and tickets will be required to visit the tree. Watch the mayor's remarks.
During a press conference, NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio announced new guidelines for viewing this year's Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, and advised people to watch the televised lighting instead of coming to see it in person.
Boris Johnson has said there is evidence that the new variant of coronavirus spreading across the UK could be more deadly than the original strain.

Government scientists suggested the strain may lead to 30% or 40% more deaths. They said that for men in their 60s, 10 out of 1,000 would be expected to die from the original virus. With the variant strain, the number of deaths per 1,000 has risen to 13 or 14.

The government's chief scientific adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, said there is a lot of uncertainty around the numbers but it is of concern.

There is good news on the vaccination programme with a record number of doses administered in the past 24 hours.

However Boris Johnson warned that the infection rate is still "forbiddingly high" and he said he can't consider lifting restrictions in England until it's clear that the vaccination programme is working.

But there's one vital question that scientists can't yet answer. Will people who have had the jab still be able to pass the virus on?

Sophie Raworth presents BBC News at Ten reporting by health editor Hugh Pym, deputy political editor Vicki Young and science editor David Shukman.

Share Video:

Embed Video: