The Wall Street Journal

Amid Measles Outbreak, How Facebook and Others Fight Antivaccine Misinformation

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As the U.S. battles the largest measles outbreak in decades, big tech companies like Facebook, YouTube and WhatsApp are trying to tamp down the spread of misinformation about vaccines. WSJ's Spencer Macnaughton explains. Photo Composite: Adele Morgan/The Wall Street Journal


On January 6th, Rioters stormed the U.S. capitol building to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. These events were inspired by President Trump and organized and promoted on the platforms of publicly traded companies, most notably Facebook and Twitter. To avoid further violence, those companies, and then many more thereafter including YouTube, banned or blocked President Trump's access to the megaphone they provide. This exposed a major flaw in the business model of many social media platforms: share first, think later. Tech experts Chamath Palihapitiya, Roger McNamee, Chris Kelly and Dick Costolo all predict major changes coming in the social media landscape and Section 230. Watch the video to find out how big tech may be forced to change.
President Donald Trump has been banned indefinitely from Facebook and Instagram.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a statement: "We believe the risks of allowing the President to continue to use our service during this period are simply too great.

"Therefore, we are extending the block we have placed on his Facebook and Instagram accounts indefinitely and for at least the next two weeks until the peaceful transition of power is complete."
President-elect Joe Biden's Inauguration is happening amid a pandemic, security threats and tension between the shifting administrations. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), who serves on the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, describes preparation for the extraordinary circumstances.
"NBC News' Brandy Zadrozny reports on the newest efforts by Facebook to remove pages spreading misinformation about natural cures and vaccines for Covid-19.

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